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"DEATH CAFE"

WHATDeath Cafe is a place for people to come together in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss their thoughts and feelings about death (a topic which is rarely discussed.)
WHYTo provide a neutral, safe, comfortable and confidential space, where people can express their views and thoughts about death safely.
WHEREFounder - Jon Underwood based on work by Swiss sociologist Bernard Crettaz. United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and several other countries.


Program Description


"If you're going to talk about a subject most people don't want to talk about, why not do so over tea and cake and cookies? Why not gather in a sunny living room looking out on a lush tangle of green, where you can watch the breeze ruffle the leaves on the trees as you eat forkfuls of blueberry tart? Death comes to each of us, to everyone we love. Couldn't talking about it in a safe, comfy setting make the prospect less frightening?"

-latimes.com article: Passing thoughts at L.A.'s first Death Café.

"A death cafe isn't a physical cafe - it's more like a temporary event. Underwood held his first death cafe a year and a half ago in his own basement. He set tea and cake, and his mother, who happens to be a psychotherapist, helped facilitate. Since then, he's been working to launch the idea as a worldwide movement."
-npr.org article: Death Cafes Breathe Life Into Conversations About Dying.

“Death Cafe” is not intended to lead participants towards any particular conclusion, product or course of action. Discussions may range from talking about death with respect to feelings about death, opinions, wills, advanced care directives, and grieving rituals.

“Death Cafe” is not intended to be grief support groups but to provide an open discussion on the idea of death and to reduce the taboos around talking about death.

The “Death Cafe” website has an online guide for those communities looking to start their own “Death Cafe.”

The ‘How to Start a Death Cafe’ encourages new “Death Cafes” to:

-Be free from Ideology and not lead participants to any particular view of life, death, after life products, services, etc.
-Promote a safe and nurturing environment where people can express their thoughts and feelings and talk about death.
-Be open to all religions, faiths, and people of all walks of life.
-To keep participants thoughts and feelings confidential.
source:deathcafe.com, npr.org, latimes.com

WATCH VIDEO ON OHIO "DEATH CAFE"

 

 

Find out more about “Death Cafe”



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